100 Gallon Community Tank Stocking Ideas.

Creating a freshwater community fish tank is included in every aquarist wishlist. However, we have to look for multiple factors when adding different fish species to the same tank. 

When creating a community tank, it is necessary to ensure that all the fishes get their ideal living conditions and live peacefully. So, How do we decide what fish to add to a 100-gallon community tank? Let us find out.

When creating a community tank, it is necessary to ensure that all the fish have a similar temperament and water parameters requirement. Also, we have to ensure that they are compatible with each other. These are the best community fish for your 100-gallon community tank:

  1. Guppies
  2. Harlequin rasboras
  3. Molly
  4. Platy
  5. Neon tetras
  6. Pictus catfish
  7. Bristlenose pleco
  8. Diamond tetra
  9. Cardinal tetra
  10. Cory catfish
  11. Swordtails
  12. Zebra danios
  13. Dwarf gourami
  14. Kuhli loach
  15. Rainbow fish

This article will also discuss how to set up a 100-gallon community tank. So let us get into it.

How to decide what fish can go together in a 100-gallon community tank?

Setting up a 100-gallon community tank is a great idea, as your tank will look very colorful and attractive.

However, it is necessary to ensure that the fishes you will add to your community tank are compatible with each other when planning to make a community tank.

You should always consider adding non-aggressive and calm fish to a community tank.

Adding non-aggressive and calm fish will help you eliminate aggression and territorial behavior, which will help all your fish live peacefully.

We have multiple options when it comes to adding peaceful fish to a community tank.

Now, to decide what fish we can keep together in a community tank, all these things are necessary to consider:

  1. Water parameters requirement
  2. Size of the fish
  3. Minimum space requirement of the fish
  4. Nutrition requirement of the fish
  5. The hardiness of the fish

Also read: Best Fish For A 15-Gallon Column Tank?

Water parameters

All the fish you are going to keep in a community tank must have a similar water parameters requirement.

The water parameters include water temperature, water pH level, Water TDS level, and water hardness.

If your fish lives in a tank with inadequate water parameters, it will suffer from various issues like stress and illness, and even it can pass away in the worst case.

Size of the fish

The size of the fish also matters a lot when making a community tank.

It is natural in fish that big fish will try to chase and hunt down the small fish.

You should know that every carnivore and omnivore fish will try to feed on fishes that are smaller than them.

So, if you add small and big fish together in a community tank, your small fish will be at risk of getting eaten by the big ones.

Adding fishes that are similar in size is recommended as doing this will make them live peacefully without any threat.

Minimum space requirement of a fish

When we keep fish in captivity, we should ensure providing ideal living conditions for fish, and giving them enough space is one of them.

Providing your fish with enough space to live and swim comfortably is necessary to ensure their stress-free and longer lifespan.

The one-inch one-gallon rule makes it easy for us to calculate the space requirement of the fish.

The one-inch one-gallon rule means one inch of fish per gallon of water.

Following this rule will help you to provide your fish with enough space to live comfortably.

Also read: How Many Fish In A 10-Gallon Tank?

Nutrition requirement of a fish

Food plays an essential role in keeping your fish fit and healthy.

Now, when we add different and lots of fish in a tank, it becomes difficult for all the fish to eat food in a regular manner.

When fish don’t get food regularly, they become weak and prone to various diseases and parasites.

You can consider adding bottom, top, and middle swimmers fish when creating a community tank.

There are varieties of food available for bottom and surface swimmers.

Sinking pellets, bottom feeder tablets, and other sinking food are present for bottom swimmers, and floating flakes and pellets for top swimmers.

So, adding the top and bottom swimmer fish will make it easy to feed all your fish.

Also read: How Often Should I Feed My Fish?

The hardness of the fish

Hardy fishes are fish that can live between a wide range of water parameters and conditions.

In a community tank, we add different types of fish species, making it challenging to provide them with their ideal parameters.

So, adding a hardy fish will extend the range of water parameters, making it easy to house them in a community tank.

A hardy fish will also easily adapt to the surroundings and have a comfortable life in a community tank.

How many fish can I keep in a 100-gallon community tank?

When deciding the number of fish to stock in a community tank, we must follow the one-inch one-gallon rule.

The one-inch one-gallon rule means one inch of fish per gallon of water.

For example, neon tetra can be 4 inches long, so you can add 20-22 neon tetra in a 100-gallon tank.

The plants, substrate, and other decors will acquire some of the space in the tank, so you have to leave some space for that when following the one-inch one-gallon rule.

How to decide what fish to keep in a community tank?

As discussed above, we should always make sure to add fishes that are compatible with each other when creating a community tank.

When creating a community tank, you have two options: a community tank of big fish or create a community tank of small fish.

Some of the best fishes you can consider adding to your community tank when adding small fishes are neon tetras, guppies, rasboras, corydoras, bristlenose pleco, molly, platy, and zebra danios.

All these fishes are peaceful in nature and a great fit in a community tank.

Now, if you go for a community tank with big fish, the options are fewer than small fish.

Also, you can’t make a community tank of big fish with a 100-gallon tank, as big fishes like the Bala shark and common adult plecostomus will require a bigger tank to thrive.

Big fishes like goldfish and angelfish cannot live together as they don’t have similar water parameters requirements.

Adding aggressive and calm fish in a tank will result in bullying and chasing in the tank.

Here are the 15 best fish for a 100-gallon community tank.

Here are the best 15 fish for your 100-gallon community tank:

  1. Guppies
  2. Neon tetras
  3. Rasboras
  4. Cory catfish
  5. Bristlenose plecos
  6. Molly
  7. Platy
  8. Gouramis
  9. Swordtails
  10. Rainbow fish
  11. Cardinal tetras
  12. Kuhli loach
  13. Zebra danios
  14. Pictus catfish
  15. Diamond tetra

Guppies

  • Scientific Name: Poecilia reticulata
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 1.2-2.4 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 10 Gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 72-82 °F 
  • Water pH level: 6.8-7.8
  • Swimming level: Middle 
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Guppies are the best fish to add to your community tank due to their calm nature and attractive color.

Adding guppies to your community tank will make your tank look attractive.

Male guppies especially have more colorful bodies and fins.

Keep your guppy fish in a planted community tank, and they will thrive.

Also, they are schooling fish and like to live in a large groups.

To prevent breeding stress on females, consider keeping 5-6 guppies with more females than males.

Also read: Can Guppy Live With Molly?

Neon tetras

  • Scientific Name: Parcheirodon innesi
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 1.5 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 10 gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 68-82 °F 
  • Water pH level: 5-7.5
  • Swimming level: Middle
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Neon tetras are also a good option for your community tank.

They are small fish with very much attractive blue and red colors.

You will love to see them moving back and forth.

Keep them in a large group of at least 6-8 and provide them ample space to live; they will thrive.

Harlequin Rasboras

  • Scientific Name: Trigonostigma heteromorpha
  • Difficulty Level: Intermediate
  • Size: 2 inch
  • Tank Size Requirement: 10-gallon
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 73-82 °F
  • Water pH level: 6-7.5
  • Swimming level: Top to mid dwelling
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

You can add harlequin rasboras to your community tank as they are very peaceful fish and will live peacefully with other fishes.

There are dozens of rasboras species, but harlequin rasboras are the most attractive species, and people love to add them to their community tanks.

They appear reddish-copper, with black wedges covering the rare half of their body.

They are small in size and should be kept with fishes similar to their size, as bigger fish will see them as a treat.

Keep them in a planted tank and provide ample space to swim, and they will thrive.

Also, they are schooling fish and prefer to live in a group of 8-10 fish.

Cory catfish

  • Scientific Name: Corydoras
  • Difficulty Level: East
  • Size: 2-4 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 20 gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 72-82 °F 
  • Water pH level: Between 7 and 8 
  • Swimming level: Bottom
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Cory catfish are the best bottom dwellers fish you can add to your community tank.

They are peaceful creatures and love to live and swim with other peaceful fish.

They like to live in a group of at least 5-6 of their species.

So, keep them in a group and provide ample space, and they will thrive.

Also read: Can Cory Catfish Live With Plecos?

Bristlenose plecos

  • Scientific Name: Ancistrus cirrhosus
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 5 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 40 gallons
  • Diet: Herbivore
  • Water Temperature: 73-81 °F 
  • Water pH level: 5.8-7.8
  • Swimming level: Bottom
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Bristlenose plecos are also a great fit in a community tank.

They are bottom-dweller fish and will help you keep the tank clean from soft algae and other waste.

Consider keeping one bristlenose pleco in your community tank.

They are peaceful fish and will live peacefully with other non-aggressive fish in a community tank.

Molly

  • Scientific Name: Poecilia sphenops
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate
  • Size: 4-5 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 20 Gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 75-80 °F 
  • Water pH level: 7.5-8.5
  • Swimming level: Middle and top 
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Mollies are also a good option for a community tank because of their peaceful nature and attractive appearance.

They come in different patterns and colors. All mollies are peaceful in nature, so you don’t have to worry about choosing the peaceful one.

Keep them in a group of at least 3-4 as they are shoaling fish and like to live in a group.

Platy

  • Scientific Name: Xiphophorus spp.
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 2.8 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 20 gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 70-82 °F 
  • Water pH level: 7-8
  • Swimming level: Mid and top
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Platies are also a great addition to your community fish tank.

These livebearers will make your tank attractive with their bright colors.

They are peaceful in nature and will love to live with other non-aggressive fish in a community tank.

Also, platy will help you to control the algae issues too.

They are schooling fish and will thrive living in a small groups of 5-6.

Dwarf Gourami

  • Scientific Name: Trichogaster lalius
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate
  • Size: 2.5-3 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 10 Gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 75-80 °F 
  • Water pH level: 6.8-7.8
  • Swimming level: Mid and top
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

This fish will attract anyone who passes by the tank. Add a pair of gourami to your community tank, and they will make your tank look attractive.

Gouramis are easy to take care of, making them a perfect fish for beginners.

Gourami is a non-aggressive fish and will love to live and interact with other fishes in a community tank.

Swordtails

  • Scientific Name: Xiphophorus helleri
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 5.5-6.3 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 15 gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 64-82 °F 
  • Water pH level: 7-8.5
  • Swimming level: Middle and top
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Swordtails are also known to be the best choice for a community fish tank because of their non-aggressive nature and easy care.

Swordtails are very attractive fish, especially male swordtails, as they have a caudal fin in a shape of a sword, which makes the male one more attractive.

However, you can see some aggression if you keep more males than females. So, consider keeping more female swordtails than males.

Rainbow fish

  • Scientific Name: Milanotaeniidae
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 4-7.9 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 30 gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 74-78 °F 
  • Water pH level: 7 and 8
  • Swimming level: Middle
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Rainbow fish will also make your community tank super attractive.

Their blue head with read rears looks attractive.

They are easy to take care of fish and very peaceful in nature, which makes them the perfect fit for your community tank.

You can keep them with fish similar to their size or smaller, like corydoras, zebra danios, and rasboras.

Keep them in a planted community tank with other non-aggressive fish, and they will thrive.

Also, being social creatures, they like to be in a group.

Cardinal tetras

  • Scientific Name: Paracheirodon axelrodi
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 1.25 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 20 gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 73-80 °F 
  • Water pH level: 5-6
  • Swimming level: Middle 
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Cardinal tetras are similar to neon tetras. Only their red stripe makes them look different.

There is no doubt that cardinal tetras are more attractive than neon tetras.

Both of them require the same living conditions and will thrive living with non-aggressive fish in your community tank.

Kuhli loach

  • Scientific Name: Pangio Kuhlii
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 3-4 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 20-Gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 73-86°F 
  • Water pH level: 5.5-6.5
  • Swimming level: Bottom 
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

These creatures will also be a great choice for your community tank.

They are mostly active at night and will remain quiet during the daytime.

Kuhli loach is a great cleaner and will start their activity of scavenging food at night.

Zebra danios

  • Scientific Name: Danio rerio
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 1.5-2.5 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 10 gallons
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 64-75 °F 
  • Water pH level: 6.5-7.5
  • Swimming level: All levels
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Zebra danios are also a good choice to add to a community tank.

They are peaceful and colorful creatures, which makes your community tank look beautiful.

Their calm nature and easy maintenance make them a good choice for beginners.

Keep them in a large group of at least 4-5, and they will thrive.

Also read: Can Zebra Danios Live With Neon Tetras?

Pictus catfish

  • Scientific Name: Pimelodus pictus
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 5 to 6 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 50 gallon
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 74-78 °F
  • Water pH level: 7-7.4
  • Swimming level: Bottom dweller
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Pictus catfish are the most attractive bottom dweller fish, and you can happily add them to your community tank.

Their non-aggressive and hardy nature makes them a good option for a community tank.

Pictus catfish are famous for their long barbels, which can be as long as their body.

They use their barbels to navigate the food inside the substrate.

They will love to live with other fish like other catfish, large platies, and giant danios.

Diamond tetra

  • Scientific Name: Moenkhausia pittieri
  • Difficulty Level: Easy
  • Size: 2-2.4 inches
  • Tank Size Requirement: 15-gallon
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Water Temperature: 72-82 °F
  • Water pH level: 6-7.5
  • Swimming level: Top swimmers
  • Temperament: Peaceful
  • Planted Tank Suitability: Yes

Diamond tetras are also a great addition to your community tank.

Their easy maintenance and hardy nature attract most beginners.

Diamond tetras are somewhere bigger than other tetras. Their perfect and gorgeous finish of scales gives them the common name of diamond tetras.

You can keep them in a community tank with other non-aggressive mates.

They will thrive living in a group of 4-5 of their own and with other fishes.

Ideas of stocking community fish in a 100-gallon tank.

Fishkeeping IdeaFish For 100-Gallon Community Tank
Stocking idea no 110 guppies, 5 cory catfish, 10 cardinal tetras, 1 kuhli loach, 2 dwarf gouramis, 4 molly, 5 platy
Stocking idea no 210 neon tetras, 10 zebra danios, 1 kuhli loach, 5 cory catfish, 3 rainbow fish, 3 swordtails
Stocking idea no 310 diamond tetras, 10 guppies, 1 bristlenose pleco, 10 zebra danios, 10 harlequin rasboras, 5 cory catfish, 2 rainbow fish
Stocking idea no 45 rainbow fish, 5 molly, 10 platy, 2 dwarf gouramis, 10 diamond tetras
Stocking idea no 55 pictus catfish, 10 guppies, 10 neon tetras, 2 dwarf gouramis
Stocking idea no 61 kuhli loach, 10 zebra danios, 10 cardinal tetras, 5 amano shrimp, 5 cory catfish, 5 swordtails
Stocking idea no 71 bristlenose pleco, 5 molly, 5 platy, 10 neon tetras, 2 dwarf gouramis, 10 harqulin rasboras, 5 guppies
Stocking ideas for a 100-gallon community tank.

How to set up a 100-gallon community tank?

For setting up your 100-gallon community tank, all you will be required are:

  1. Substrate
  2. Filter
  3. Heater
  4. Light
  5. Air pump
  6. Live aquatic plants

Substrate

A substrate is some inch-thick base that we create in a tank, which makes your tank look beautiful, and also, your fish get engaged in it, searching for food all the time.

Also, it is necessary to add a substrate in a tank when planning to make a planted tank, as it provides a place for your plant to root.

However, when adding a bottom-dweller fish, it is necessary to add soft substrates like sand, as any hard or sharp substrate will end up harming their barbels.

You have multiple color options for a substrate, which will make your tank look attractive, but we suggest adding a dark color substrate as it will help you mimic your fish’s natural habitat, and your tank will look amazing.

You will require at least a 100-pound substrate for a 100-gallon tank.

Also read: How Much Substrate For A 75-Gallon Tank?

Filter

A filter is the most necessary thing you always consider adding to your fish tank.

Adding a filter with biofilter media will help you keep the water clean and protected from harmful toxins like ammonia and nitrite.

A tank without a filter will require more frequent water changes and cleaning; also, after doing all this, you will not be able to maintain the water chemistry.

There are different types of filters present in the market:

  1. Sponge filter
  2. Canister filter
  3. Internal filter
  4. Aquarium sumps
  5. Hang-on filter

Cannister filters and aquarium sumps are the best options for a big-size tank.

We recommend buying an Aqueon Quietflow Canister filter for your 100-gallon tank, as it will ensure to keep your tank is clean and protected from harmful toxins.

You can buy this product at amazon: Aqueon Quietflow Canister Filter.

Heater

Many freshwater tropical fish require warm water to thrive.

Also, fishes require a stable water temperature to live comfortably.

Unstable water temperature will make your fish come under stress and become prone to various diseases and parasites.

So, consider adding a heater to your fish tank to ensure stable water temperature and avoid such issues.

You can consider adding a Fluval E300 Advanced Electronic Heater for your 100-gallon tank, as it will keep the water temperature ideal and stable.

You can buy this product at amazon: Fluval E300 Advanced Electronic Heater.

Light

Light is also necessary for your fish tank.

If you are making a planted tank, then light is very much necessary for plant growth.

Adding light to your fish tank will make the tank look beautiful.

Consider keeping the lights on for at most 8 hours a day, as keeping it on for more than that will end up in algae growth.

We recommend using the HYGGER CLIP ON FULL SPECTRUM AQUARIUM LED LIGHT as it will provide your fish and plants with enough light.

You can buy this product at amazon: Hygger Clip On.

Consider adding a timer so that the light automatically gets on and off.

Air pump

You can also consider adding an air pump to your fish tank.

Lack of oxygen in the water can make your fish suffer from various issues, and even they can pass away in the worst cases.

Also, you must know that beneficial bacteria that are present in our tank require oxygen to break down harmful toxins like ammonia and nitrite.

Adding an air pump to your fish tank will keep the tank well-oxygenated and prevent all such issues.

Consider adding a Tetra Whispers Air Pump for your 100-gallon tank.

You can buy this product at amazon: Tetra Whispers Air Pump.

Live plants

Many freshwater tropical fish love to live in a planted tank as it mimics their natural habitat.

Plants will not only make your tank look attractive but will also ensure enough oxygen and good hiding spots for your fish.

Plants keep the water clean by absorbing the nutrients, resulting in clean water and less algae.

These are some best plants you can consider adding to your community fish tank:

  1. Java moss
  2. Java fern
  3. Anubias nana
  4. Amazon sword
  5. Micro sword
  6. Vallisneria

Conclusion:

When creating a community tank, we should always make sure to add fish with non-aggressive nature and similar parameters requirements.

Fishes like guppies, mollies, platy, neon tetras, corydoras, and bristlenose plecos are the best community tank additions.

To avoid overcrowding, you should always add a number of fish by following the one-inch one-gallon rule.

Avoid keeping aggressive and non-aggressive fish in the same tank, as it will result in bullying and chasing in your tank.

Things like filters, substrate, light, heater, plants, and air pump are the necessary things you should consider adding to your fish tank to provide your fish with ideal living conditions.


Reference: AquariumIndustries

Hemant

Welcome to housedpet.com. My name is Hemant, and I am here to solve every problem you get while having a pet. With years of experience, I can assure you that you will find every solution to your problem in housedpet.com.

Recent Posts